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HHS Plans To Launch Cybersecurity Center Focused On Medical App Security

The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced on April 20 that it plans to launch a cybersecurity initiative modeled on the US Department of Homeland Security’s National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) that will be aimed at educating healthcare organizations and consumers about the risks of using mobile applications and data. The new center, which will be called the Health Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (HCCIC), is intended to be a collaborative effort between public and privacy industry. A similar cybersecurity initiative is being developed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

Chris Wlaschin, the chief information security officer for HHS, says this type of collaborative center is needed because approximately 50% of US healthcare organizations lack the adequate tools to deter and manage cyber breaches. As mobile health applications become more prevelant, the HHS sees the HCCIC as an opportunity to help developers secure patient data.

The new HHS center represents a continual effort by the federal government to address healthcare app cybersecurity. In December 2016, the FDA released guidance on “Mobile Medical Applications.” The HHS Office of Civil Rights and Federal Trade Commission  have also launched online resources for medical app cybersecurity. And HHS’s Health Care Industry Cybersecurity Task Force recently submitted a draft report to Congress that laid out six “imperatives” for lawmakers and executive branch officials to consider when seeking to secure patient data, including security surrounding applications.

If you or your company is developing, or has implemented a medical app, the Dentons Privacy and Cybersecurity Group can help you navigate this constantly developing federal landscape. We will also provide further updates as the HCCIC becomes operational this summer.

HHS Plans To Launch Cybersecurity Center Focused On Medical App Security

DHS Warns Congress On Mobile Device Security

On May 4, 2017, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) submitted a new study to Congress that detailed current and emerging threats to the Federal government’s use of mobile devices and provided recommendations for security improvements. The DHS Science and Technology Directorate in coordination with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and its National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence were responsible for the study.

Overview of Study

The study found that threats to the mobile device ecosystem are growing, and that security of mobile computing is improving. The study also found that threats to the Federal government’s use of smartphones and tablets running mobile operating systems were prevalent across the mobile device ecosystem, and presented a separate and distinct threat from those impacting desktop workstations. The study found that threats to mobile devices range from those perpetrated by nation-states to those committed by organized crime or hackers, and that Federal government mobile devices may be targeted specifically because of their public nature.

Key Recommendations

The study provides a series of recommendations to enhance the Federal government mobile device security measures. A number of these recommendations could be helpful for business to adopt as well:

  • Adopt a framework for mobile device security based on existing standards and best practices.
  • Coordinate the adoption and advancement of mobile security technologies into operational programs to ensure that future capabilities include protection and defense against mobile threats.
  • Develop cooperative arrangements and capabilities with mobile network operators to detect, protect against, and respond to threats.
  • Create a new defensive security research program to address vulnerabilities in mobile network infrastructure and increase security and resilience.
  • Develop policies and procedures regarding U.S. Government use of mobile devices overseas based on threat intelligence and emerging attacker tactics, techniques, and procedures.

This new study highlights the vulnerabilities present in mobile device usage in the workplace. The Dentons Privacy and Cybersecurity team can help you and your business develop a robust and comprehensive mobile defense strategy, and update your existing policies to guard against the growing threats presented to the mobile device ecosystem.

DHS Warns Congress On Mobile Device Security

Tennessee Adds New Encryption And Timing Requirements To Its Data Breach Notification Law

On April 4, 2017, Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam signed into law an amendment to the state’s data breach notification law, making two substantive changes to the statute:

  1. Adding a technically specific safe harbor encryption provision; and
  2. Adding a 45 day window to complete breach notification, when required.

Overall Summary of Breach Notification Law

Tennessee’s data breach notification law applies to any person or business conducting business in Tennessee that owns or licenses computerized data that contains “personal information.” “Personal information” is defined under the statute as a person’s first name or initial and last name combined with:

  • Social security number;
  • Driver’s license number; or
  • Account number, credit or debit card number, in combination with any required security code, access code, or password that would permit access to an individual’s financial account.

“Personal information” does not include publicly available information that is lawfully made available to the general public from federal, state, or local government records. Covered entities that are subject to Title V of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 or the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as expanded by the Health Information Technology for Clinical and Economic Health Act, are exempt from the law.

The statute requires covered entities to disclose a “breach in the security of the system” to any resident of Tennessee whose personal information was, or is reasonably believed to have been, acquired by an “unauthorized person.”

New Encryption Requirements

Under the new law, the phrase “breach in the security of the system” has been amended to read “breach of system security,” and is defined to mean the acquisition of: (1) unencrypted computerized data; or (2) encrypted computerized data and the encryption key that contains personal information by an unauthorized person that materially compromises the security, confidentiality, or integrity of personal information maintained by the information holder. The new statute defines encrypted to mean “computerized data that is rendered unusable, unreadable, or indecipherable without the use of a decryption process or key and in accordance with the current version of the Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 140-2[.]” FIPS 140 is a US government standard that defines minimum security requirements for cryptographic modules in products and systems, as set forth in Section 5131 of the Information Technology Management Reform Act of 1996. Therefore, under the new amendment, if the information acquired was encrypted pursuant to the FIPS 140-2 standards, and the encryption key was not compromised, notification is likely not required.

Notification Clarification

The new amendment also imposes a specific time frame for completing notification, when required. Disclosure now must be made no later than 45 days from the discovery or notification of the “breach of system security,” unless a longer period of time is required due to the legitimate needs of law enforcement. Specifically, notification may be delayed if a law enforcement agency determines that the notification will impede a criminal investigation. This change makes Tennessee the eighth state to enact a statute that puts a specific time period on the notification requirement. The majority of states only require notification in the “most expedient time possible” or “without unreasonable delay.”

Takeaways

Cyber threat preparation and monitoring remains the first and best line of defense against data breaches. Dentons helps companies prepare for breach by formulating written incident response plans, conducting table-top exercises with key members of the incident response teams, and advising companies on compliance with data notification reporting requirements, such as the new requirements now applicable in Tennessee. Our team is ready to help you or your business navigate this complicated area of the law, and help with the growing need for encryption requirements.

Tennessee Adds New Encryption And Timing Requirements To Its Data Breach Notification Law

Internet of Things (IoT) Security Takes Center Stage At FBI, DHS, NIST and Congress

On October 21, 2016, a domain name service host and internet management company experienced at least two waves of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack that impacted at least 80 websites, including those belonging to Netflix, Twitter and CNN.  The attack was launched by infecting millions of American’s Internet of Things (IoT) connected devices with a variation of the Mirai malware.  The Mirai malware primarily targets IoT devices such as routers, digital video records and webcams / security cameras by exploiting their use of default usernames and passwords and coordinating them into a botnet used to conduct DDoS attacks.  The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) does not have confirmation of a group or individual responsible for the attack.  In September 2016, two of the largest IoT DDoS attacks using the same malware disrupted the operations of a gaming server and computer security blogger website.

In light of these attacks, there has been an increased focus on IoT security at the FBI, the U.S. Department of Homeland and Security (DHS), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Capitol Hill.

FBI Guidance

Five days after the October 21, 2016 attack, the FBI issued a Private Industry Notification, providing a list of precautionary measures stakeholders should take to mitigate “a range of potential DDoS threats and IoT compromise,” including but not limited to:

  • Having a DDoS mitigation strategy ready ahead of time and keeping logs of any potential attacks;
  • Implementing an incident response plan that includes DDoS mitigation.  The plan may involve external organizations such as law enforcement;
  • Implementing a data back-up and recovery plan to maintain copies of sensitive or proprietary data in a separate and secure location;
  • Reviewing reliance on easily identified internet connections for critical operations, particularly those shared with public facing web servers;
  • Ensuring upstream firewalls are in place to block incoming UDP packets;
  • Changing default credentials on all IoT devices; and
  • Ensuring that software or firmware updates are applied as soon as the device manufacturer releases them.

A copy of the FBI Notification can be found here.

DHS Guidance

On November 15, 2016, the DHS issued its own non-binding guidance for prioritizing IoT security, aimed at IoT developers, IoT manufacturers, service providers, industrial and business-level consumers.  According to the DHS, there are six non-binding principles that, if followed, will help account for security as stakeholders develop, manufacture, implement or use network-connected devices.

Principle #1 – Incorporate Security at the Design Phase

The DHS notes that security should be evaluated as an integral component of any network-connected device.  Building security “in at the design phase reduces potential disruptions and avoids the much more difficult and expensive endeavor of attempting to add security to products after they have been developed and deployed.”  To that end, the DHS suggests the following practices:

  • Enable security by default through unique, hard to crack default user names and passwords.
  • Build the device using the most recent operating system that is technically viable and economically feasible.
  • Use hardware that incorporates security features to strengthen the protection and integrity of the device.
  • Design with system and operational disruption in mind.

Principle #2 – Advance Security Updates and Vulnerability Management

Even when security is included at the design stage, vulnerabilities may be discovered in products after they have been sent to market.  The DHS notes these flaws can be mitigated through patching, security updates, and vulnerability management strategies.  Suggested practices include:

  • Consider ways to secure the device over network connections or through automated means.
  • Consider coordinating software updates among third-party vendors to address vulnerabilities and security improvements to ensure consumer devices have the complete set of current protections.
  • Develop automated mechanisms for addressing vulnerabilities.
  • Develop a policy regarding the coordinated disclosure of vulnerabilities, including associated security practices to address identified vulnerabilities.
  • Develop an end-of-life strategy for IoT products.

Principle #3 – Build on Proven Security Practices

According to the DHS, many tested practices used in traditional IT and network security can be applied to IoT, and can help identify vulnerabilities, detect irregularities, respond to potential incidents and recover from damage or disruption to IoT devices.  The DHS recommends NIST’s framework for cybersecurity risk management, which has widely been adopted by private industry and integrated across sectors.  Other suggested practices include:

  • Start with basic software security and cyber security practices, and apply them to the IoT ecosystem in flexible, adaptive and innovative ways.
  • Refer to relevant Sector-Specific Guidance, where it exists, as a starting point from which to consider security practices (e.g., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently released guidance on Cybersecurity Best Practices for Modern Vehicles and the Food and Drug Administration released draft guidance on Postmarket Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices).
  • Practice defense in depth.
  • Participate in information sharing platforms to report vulnerabilities and receive timely and critical information about current cyber threats and vulnerabilities from public  and private partners.

Principle #4 – Prioritize Security Measures According to Potential Impact

The DHS recognizes that risk models differ substantially across the IoT ecosystem, and the consequences of a security failure will vary significantly.  The DHS therefore recommends:

  • Knowing a device’s intended use and environment, where possible;
  • Performing a “red-teaming” exercise where developers actively try to bypass the security measures needed at the application, network, data or physical layers; and
  • Identifying and authenticating the devices connected to the network, especially for industrial consumers and business networks.

Principle #5 – Promote Transparency Across IoT

Where possible, the DHS recommends that developers and manufacturers know their supply chain, and whether there are any associated vulnerabilities with the software and hardware components provided by vendors outside their organization.  This increased awareness could help manufacturers and industrial consumers identify where and how to apply security measures or build in redundancies.  Recommended practices include:

  • Conduct end-to-end risk assessments that account for both internal and third party vendor risks, where possible.
  • Consider the creation of a publicly disclosed mechanism for using vulnerability reports.
  • Consider developing and employing a software bill of materials that can be used as a means of building shared trust among vendors and manufacturers.

Principle #6 – Connect Carefully and Deliberately

The DHS notes that consumers, particularly in the industrial context, should “deliberately consider whether continuous connectivity is needed given the use of the IoT device and the risks associated with its disruption.”  To that end, suggested practices include:

  • Advise IoT consumers on the intended purpose of any network connections
  • Making intentional connections.
  • Build in controls to allow manufacturers, service providers, and consumers to disable network connections or specific ports when needed or desired to enable selective connectivity.

A copy of the DHS guidance can be found here.

NIST Guidelines

On November 15, 2016, NIST released its own guidance advising IoT manufacturers and developers to implement security safeguards and to monitor those systems on a regular basis.  NIST is responsible for developing information security standards and guidelines, including minimum requirements for federal information systems.  The new NIST Special Publication 800-160 is the product of four years of research and development, and focuses largely on engineering actions that are required to ensure connected devices are able to prevent and recover from cyber attacks, and lays out dozens of technical standards and security principles for developers to consider.

A complete copy of the NIST guidance can be found here.

Congressional Hearing

One day after the DHS and NIST guidance was released, on November 16, 2016, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade and the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology held a hearing on “Understanding the Role of Connected Devices in Recent Cyber Attacks.”  The witnesses were Dale Drew of Level 3 Communications, Kevin Fu of Virta Labs and the University of Michigan, and Bruce Schneier from the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard University.

The witnesses uniformly recommended that while the DDos attack in October was just on popular websites, and not critical infrastructure, attacks toward critical infrastructure, including public safety and hospital systems, are likely.  Each witness stressed the importance of addressing the vulnerabilities at the onset of developing technology, and urged greater oversight by lawmakers.

A video of this hearing can be found here.

Internet of Things (IoT) Security Takes Center Stage At FBI, DHS, NIST and Congress

US Officially Blames Russia For DNC Hack

The United States (US) Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) issued a joint statement on Friday, October 7, 2016, publicly stating for the first time that the US Intelligence Community is “confident” that the “Russian Government directed the recent compromises of e-mails from US persons and institutions, including from US political organizations.”

DNC Attack Background

Last April, after the DNC discovered malware on its computer systems, it hired third party cybersecurity firm CrowdStrike to investigate the breach.  After completing its investigation, CrowdStrike issued a report in June 2016 linking the attacks to two groups associated with Russia:

  • “Cozy Bear,” a group suspected of previously attacking networks at the White House, State Department and Joint Chiefs of Staff; and
  • “Fancy Bear,” a group suspected to have targeted public and private entities for decades.

CrowdStrike linked the attacks of Cozy Bear and Fancy Bear to Russia because their programming code sometimes matched the code used in earlier hacks by Russia, and their behavior matched that of Russia’s in its historic efforts to increase Russian sphere of influence in Eastern Europe.  Thousands of stolen e-mails from the DNC were subsequently published on a source called DC Leaks, which ThreatConnect, a separate cybersecurity firm, has linked to Fancy Bear.

A day after the report, someone calling themselves Guccifer 2.0 claimed responsibility for the hack in a blog post.

Joint Statement Blames Russia For DNC Hack

In Friday’s joint statement, the DHS and ODNI stated for the first time that the “recent disclosures of alleged hacked e-mails on sites like DCLeaks.com and WikiLeaks and by the Guiccer 2.0 online persona are consistent with the methods and motivations of Russia-directed efforts.”  The agencies found that the “thefts and disclosures are intended to interfere with the US election process[,]” which is activity that is not “new to Moscow – the Russians have used similar tactics and techniques across Europe and Eurasia, for example, to influence public opinion there.”  Based on the “scope and sensitivity” of such efforts, the agencies concluded that only “Russia’s senior-most officials could have authorized these activities.”

No Conclusion On Voting Machine Hacks

The joint statement stopped short of attributing the recent state election data system breaches to Russia.  These breaches, which have seen at least Illinois and Arizona experience scanning and probing of their election systems, have been tied back to servers operated by a Russian company.  The FBI is currently investigating this claim, but the DHS and ODNI said the US Intelligence Community is not “now in a position to attribute this activity to the Russian Government.”

The joint statement came on the same day as a ceasefire in Syria fell apart and the US accused Russia of war crimes in Aleppo.   A copy of the joint report can be found here.

US Officially Blames Russia For DNC Hack