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DHS And FBI Issue Joint Warning – Hackers Have Targeted Critical Sector Industries Since March 2016

On March 15, 2018, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) issued a joint Technical Alert (TA18-074A) warning “network defenders” in critical sector industries that “Russian government cyber actors” have been intentionally targeting U.S. government entities and organizations in the energy, nuclear, commercial facilities, water, aviation, and critical manufacturing sectors since at least March 2016. These threat actors, according to the joint alert, have used this campaign to engage in reconnaissance missions and to obtain operational control of industrial control processes and systems.

The joint alert identifies two targets of the ongoing attack: “staging” and “intended” targets. Staging targets are those “peripheral organizations such as trusted third-party suppliers with less secure networks.” The threat actors use the “staging” targets’ networks as “pivot points and malware repositories when targeting their final intended victims,” the intended targets. Once compromised, the staging targets are used to download source code from intended targets’ websites and to remotely access infrastructure such as corporate web-based email and virtual private network (VPN) connections. The threat actors ultimately seek to gain information from the intended target on “network and organizational design and control system capabilities within organizations.”

The joint alert identifies a variety of tactics used by the threat actors, including spear-phishing campaigns, watering-hole domain attacks, and collecting publicly available information:

  • Spear-Phishing. Through spear-phishing, the threat actors use email attachments to leverage legitimate Microsoft Office functions for retrieving a document from a remote server, which allows the threat actor to gain access to user credentials. With user credentials, and using a password-cracking technique, “the threat actors are able to masquerade as authorized users in environments that use single-factor authentication.”
  • Watering-Hole. Through watering-hole attacks, the threat actors compromise “the infrastructure of trusted organizations to reach intended targets. Approximately half of the known watering holes are trade publications and informational websites related to process control, ICS, or critical infrastructure.” These watering-holes host legitimate content developed by reputable organizations, but the threat actor alters the website to contain and reference malicious content. The threat actors use legitimate credentials to access and directly modify the website content. Once on the website, the victim provides credentials.
  • Public Information. The threat actors review information “posted to company websites, especially information that may appear to be innocuous, [to gain access to] operationally sensitive information.” In one example, the threat actors downloaded a small photo from a publicly accessible human resources page, which when expanded was “a high-resolution photo that displayed control systems equipment models and status information in the background.”

Once threat actors gain access to the network, the DHS and FBI warn they conduct “reconnaissance operations within the network,” including “identifying and browsing file servers within the intended victim’s network.” Perhaps most troubling, the DHS and FBI identified in multiple instances “the threat actors accessed workstations and servers on a corporate network that contained data output from control systems within energy generation facilities.” This access would allow the threat actors to control operations within the organization, including control of certain energy sectors.

Takeaways

The new joint alert highlights the dynamic threat landscape facing organizations. Although the alert provides technical advice concerning the identification and deterrence of the ongoing attacks, it also provides best practices applicable to the campaign. Many of the recommendations apply outside of the critical sector industries, and provide a timely reminder that all organizations should review their cybersecurity practices and policies on an ongoing basis. Some of the recommended best practices include:

  • Reviewing your existing third party contracts to determine cybersecurity vulnerabilities and protections;
  • Monitoring VPN logs for abnormal activity;
  • Deploying web and email filters on the network;
  • Ensuring proper training to inform end users on proper email and web usage;
  • Establishing a complex password policy;
  • Using multi-factor authentication;
  • Assigning appropriate personnel to review logs;
  • Completing “independent security (as opposed to compliance) risk review”; and
  • Preparing a robust incident response plan.

If you or your organization is looking to create new, or update existing cybersecurity policies or practices, or you have any questions about this joint alert and how your organization may be impacted, please reach out to the Dentons cybersecurity team to discuss how our cost effective strategies can help mitigate your risk and provide an assessment of your overall cybersecurity readiness.

Dentons is the world’s largest law firm, a leader on the Acritas Global Elite Brand Index, a BTI Client Service 30 Award winner, and recognized by prominent business and legal publications for its innovations in client service, including founding Nextlaw Labs and the Nextlaw Global Referral NetworkThe Dentons Privacy and Cybersecurity Group operates at the intersection of technology and law, and has been singled out as one of the law firms best at cybersecurity by corporate counsel, according to BTI Consulting Group.  

DHS And FBI Issue Joint Warning – Hackers Have Targeted Critical Sector Industries Since March 2016

NIST Releases Draft Update To Cybersecurity Framework

In 2014, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released its first version of the Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity (Cyber Framework). The Cyber Framework was originally developed as a voluntary framework to help private organizations and government agencies manage cybersecurity risk in the critical infrastructure space (e.g., bridges, power grid, etc.). Since then, it has been widely adopted across industry as a benchmark standard for measuring an enterprise’s cybersecurity readiness.

Following feedback NIST received in December 2015 from a Request for Information, and comments from attendees at the Cybersecurity Framework Workshop in 2016 held at the NIST campus in Maryland, NIST released a draft update to the Cyber Framework in January 2017 called Version 1.1. Some of the key changes in the draft update included:

  • Adding a new section on cybersecurity measurement to discuss the correlation of business results to cybersecurity risk management metrics and measures;
  • Expanding the use and understanding of cyber supply chain risk management frameworks;
  • Accounting for authentication, authorization, and identity proofing in the access control section of the framework; and
  • Better explaining the relationship between the various implementation tiers and profiles.

Last week, NIST released a second draft of Version 1.1, which is open for public comment through January 20, 2018. The new draft expands on issues such as supply chain security and vulnerability disclosure programs. It also emphasizes the need for companies using the framework to develop metrics to quantify their progress. NIST says it hopes to finalize Version 1.1 in the spring of 2018.

If you are interested in submitting comments on the new draft of Version 1.1, or learning more about its proposed changes that will likely take effect in 2018, the Dentons Privacy and Cybersecurity Group is ready to assist.

Dentons is the world’s largest law firm, a leader on the Acritas Global Elite Brand Index, a BTI Client Service 30 Award winner, and recognized by prominent business and legal publications for its innovations in client service, including founding Nextlaw Labs and the Nextlaw Global Referral NetworkDentons’ Privacy and Cybersecurity Group operates at the intersection of technology and law, and has been singled out as one of the law firms best at cybersecurity by corporate counsel, according to BTI Consulting Group.  

NIST Releases Draft Update To Cybersecurity Framework

Canada’s Privacy Commissioner Pursues a Stronger Consent Framework and More Proactive Enforcement

On September 21st, 2017, Daniel Therrien, Canada’s Federal Privacy Commissioner, tabled his annual report to Canada’s Parliament today. The report to Parliament includes results and recommendations with respect to the OPC’s study on consent. In addition, the Commissioner requests Parliament overhaul Canada’s federal private sector legislation – the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA).

Consent and Technology

A key issue for regulators and businesses is how to obtain meaningful and valid consent to collect and use personal information in the digital age. Revisiting and enhancing the consent model under PIPEDA is grounded in the Commissioner’s five year strategic privacy priorities. In 2016, the OPC issued a consultation paper regarding the challenges of obtaining meaningful consent in a continuously evolving technological ecosystem where the traditional “privacy policy” may not always be suitable. The OPC received feedback through roundtables, focus groups, surveys and receipt of 51 submissions from organizations, information technology specialists, academics, advocacy groups and other stakeholders.

Four Key Elements in Privacy Policies: The Commissioner stated that the OPC will be issuing an updated version of its consent guidelines that will require businesses and organizations to highlight in a user friendly way the following four key elements in their privacy notices:

  1. What information is being collected
  2. Who is it being shared with, including an enumeration of third parties
  3. The purposes for collecting, using or sharing including an explanation of purposes that are not integral to the service, and
  4. Identify the risk of harm to individuals, if any.

Risk of Harm: The OPC is amending its guidelines to require organizations to consider the risk of harm to individuals when considering the form of consent used. This consideration will be in addition to the sensitivity of the personal information and the reasonable expectations of the individual. We expect to learn more about this in the updated guidelines.

No-Go Zones: Expect new guidance for businesses and no-go zones where the use of information, even with consent, should be prohibited as inappropriate. The guidance will be aimed to provide clarity on what the OPC considers “inappropriate uses” under subsection 5(1) of PIPEDA.

Alternatives to Consent: The Commissioner outlined three potential solutions for enhancing privacy protection where traditional consent models conflict with advances in technology, including:

  1. De-identification: In some circumstances, like big data, de-identification protocols may be the right solution. The OPC will be issuing guidance on de-identification that will help businesses assess their protocols and reduce risk of re-identification to a low level where the information may be used without consent.
  2. Publicly available information: The Commissioner agrees that the categories of publicly available information in PIPEDA’s regulations are out of date, and should be revisited by Parliament. For now these exceptions remain the same, but we may someday see changes to the regulations.
  3. Call for reform of new exceptions: The Commissioner has requested that PIPEDA be amended to include new exceptions to consent (section 7 of PIPEDA) to address social activities not contemplated when PIPEDA was first drafted. The goal is to help organizations use data for new purposes that would benefit individuals and obtaining consent is not practical. For example, a mobile app wishes to now use information collected for geolocation mapping, and the business can demonstrate that the benefit of the new use of information outweighs the privacy incursion. This option would be considered a last resort and require pre-approval by the OPC.

Overhaul of PIPEDA including new Powers

The Commissioner reported that it is time to revisit how Canada’s federal privacy legislation, enacted in 2000, meets the realities of today’s digital world, including advances technology as well the addition of new enforcement powers already used by the OPC’s counterparts in the U.S. and Europe. The Commissioner proposed to Parliament that this overhaul include a new enforcement model that emphasizes proactive powers that are backed up by order-making authorities, including:

  • involuntary audits
  • issuing binding orders, and
  • impose administrative monetary penalties.

The request for reform of PIPEDA is certainly a hot topic as businesses and organizations await how Canada’s status as an adequate country is, or is not affected as a result of Europe’s General Data Protection Regulations.

Expect a more aggressive OPC

However, do not expect the OPC to wait for new powers. The Commissioner ended his report to Parliament adding that, beginning today, we can expect a more proactive and aggressive OPC with respect to enforcement. The OPC is sending a signal that complaints to the OPC will no longer be the primary tool and the OPC will be shifting itself as a proactive regulator ready to initiate investigations. The Commissioner reported that a complaint-driven model has its limits:

People are unlikely to file a complaint about something they do not know is happening, and in the age of big data and the Internet of Things, it is very difficult to know and understand what is happening to our personal information. My Office, however, is better positioned to examine these often opaque data flows and to make determinations as to their appropriateness under PIPEDA.

This is an important message. The Commissioner is not waiting for legislative reform and has put businesses and organizations on notice to expect a more active OPC, one that will be on the lookout for “specific issues or chronic problems” that must be addressed – possibly resulting in more Commissioner-initiated investigations.

More information

You can read the OPC’s news release here.

You can read the Commissioner’s remarks and full Annual Report to Parliament here.

Canada’s Privacy Commissioner Pursues a Stronger Consent Framework and More Proactive Enforcement

HHS Issues Quick Response Cyber Attack Checklist

Last month, after the WannaCry ransomware attack infected 230,000 computers in 150 countries, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office for Civil Rights (OCR) issued a “Quick-Response Checklist” for HIPPA covered entities and business associates to follow when responding to a ransomware attack or other “cyber-related security incident,” as that phrase is defined under the HIPAA Security Rule. 45 C.F.R. 164.304.

Checklist Recommendations

The checklist provides four recommendations:

  1. Execute the response and mitigation procedures and contingency plans. Entities should immediately fix any technical or other problems to stop the incident and take steps to mitigate any impermissible disclosure of protected health information (either done by the entity’s own information technology staff, or by an outside entity brought in to help).
  2. Report the crime to other law enforcement agencies. This includes state or local law enforcement, the FBI, or the Secret Service. The OCR makes clear that any such report should not include protected health information (unless otherwise permitted by the HIPPA Privacy Rule).
  3. Report all cyber threat indicators to federal and information-sharing and analysis organizations (ISAOs). A cyber threat indicator is defined under federal law as information that is necessary to identify malicious cyber activity. The US Department of Homeland Security, the HHS Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, and private-sector cyber-threat ISAOs are all identified as acceptable information-sharing organizations under the new checklist. The OCR, however, makes clear that it does not receive reports from its federal or HHS partners.
  4. Report the breach to OCR as soon as possible, “but no later than 60 days after the discovery of a breach affecting 500 or more individuals.” Entities should notify “affected individuals and the media unless a law enforcement official has requested a delay in the reporting.” The OCR also presumes that all cyber-related security incidents where protected health information was accessed, acquired, used, or disclosed are reportable breaches unless the information was encrypted by the entity at the time of the incident or the entity determines, through a written risk assessment, that there was a low probability that the information was compromised during the breach. An entity that discovers a breach affecting fewer than 500 individuals has an obligation to notify individuals without unreasonable delay, but no later than 60 days after discovery. And the OCR must be notified within 60 days after the end of the calendar year in which the breach was discovered.

In the end, the OCR states that it considers “all mitigation efforts taken by the entity during any particular breach investigation,” including the voluntary sharing of breach-related information with law enforcement agencies and other federal and analysis organizations, as outlined in the checklist.

Takeaways

The OCR’s checklist makes clear that preparing for, and responding quickly to any potential breach should be a priority for HIPPA covered entities and their business associates. This includes preparing or updating enterprise wide incident response plans, training leadership, implementing effective governance programs, and having the ability to rapidly mobilize a response to malicious activity. Dentons’ global Privacy and Cybersecurity Group, in conjunction with Dentons’ leading healthcare practice, has extensive experience helping entities prepare and execute such plans and dealing with the rapidly changing legal and regulatory landscape that emerges in the aftermath of a security incident.

Dentons is the world’s largest law firm, a leader on the Acritas Global Elite Brand Index, a BTI Client Service 30 Award winner, and recognized by prominent business and legal publications for its innovations in client service, including founding Nextlaw Labs and the Nextlaw Global Referral Network. Dentons’ global Privacy and Cybersecurity Group operates at the intersection of technology and law, and was recently singled out as one of the law firms best at cybersecurity by corporate counsel, according to BTI Consulting Group.  

HHS Issues Quick Response Cyber Attack Checklist

President Trump’s Budget Requests $1.5B For Homeland Security Cyber Unit

President Trump’s new budget includes a request to increase cybersecurity personnel and funding across several federal departments, including $1.5 billion for the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD). The NPPD is a DHS unit responsible for protecting US infrastructure from cyber threats. The DHS is responsible for protecting critical infrastructure and federal networks from cyber intrusions.

The budget document, released by the Office of Management and Budget earlier this morning, states: “The Budget supports the President’s focus on cybersecurity to ensure strong programs and technology to defend the Federal networks that serve the American people, and continues efforts to share information, standards, and best practices with critical infrastructure and American businesses to keep them secure[.]” The budget document also proposes to increase law enforcement and cyber personnel at DHS, the FBI and Department of Defense.

The President’s budget comes on the heels of his recent Executive Order aimed at strengthening cybersecurity across federal networks, critical infrastructure, and the nation writ large. It also comes in the wake of federal departments and agencies, such as DHS, Health and Human Services, and the Securities and Exchange Commission, focusing their efforts on cybersecurity in medical devicesmobile devices, financial services, and the Internet of Things (IoT).

 

President Trump’s Budget Requests $1.5B For Homeland Security Cyber Unit